Sunday, November 29, 2015

Sunday's Obituary: Richard Graham

National Intelligencer (DC)
8 August 1857


Died at Hazlewood, in the county of St. Louis (Mo.) on the 27th July, Major RICHARD GRAHAM, in the 78th year of his age.  He was the last surviving son of Richard Graham, of Dumfries, Prince William county, Va.  He was brother of George Graham, acting Secretary of War during the administration of President Monroe, and subsequently Commissioner of the General Land Office; of John Graham, first United States District Attorney for Louisiana, Secretary of Legation to Spain, Commissioner to the South American Republics, and Minister Plenipotentiary to Brazil; and of Mrs. Catherine Ramsay, of the city of Washington -- all now deceased.

Major Graham entered the military service during the last war with Great Britain, and served with distinction as Aid-de-Camp on the staff of Major General Harrison.  He participated in all of the perils and hardships of the Northwestern army, and was promoted to the rank of Major for his gallantry and good conduct.  His relations with General Harrison were peculiarly intimate, and he was, during his life, the cherished and honored friend of his commander.

The war over, Major Graham was appointed Indian Agent for the extended Territory of Missouri, in which office he continued until 1829.  He was also appointed by the President one of the Commissioners to establish the boundary lines of Illinois.

With ample fortune, Major G. has for many years, surrounded by his devoted family, led the happy life of a country gentleman, investing his favorite pursuit, agriculture, with all the charms of a refined taste and a well cultivated mind.  Social in disposition, his olden time hospitality was proveribal, and his happy home the favorite resort of a large circle of friend.

The death of such a man is a public loss -- his life a happy commentary on true patriotism, an example of blended virtues, in the conscientious discharge of every duty -- a noble-hearted, honest man.

As a Christian, he was consistent, pure, and  humble.  The study of the Holy Scriptures was his daily office, and his unaffected, unsullied goodness relfected its softened radiance on all around, and imported, as he gently and consciously passed from time to etenity, the summons brief and heart-rending to his family.

"That peace which passeth not away."

Monday, November 23, 2015

Will: John King (1797)

Prince William County Will Book H, pg. 228
16 May 1797; Proved 2 Oct 1797

In the name of God Amen I JOHN KING of the County of Prince William being weak in body but of sound & perfect mind and memory do make and publish this my last will and testament in manner and form following.

I give & bequeath unto RACHEL BOOTMAN all the property I am possessed of consisting of stock and household goods and whereas I am entitled to money due me from the Commonwealth as a pension & have impowered JOHN LINTON to draw the same for me I further give and bequeath that to RACHELL BOOTMAN the whole of the stock and household goods & money I give to the said RACHELL for the use and benefit of my four children which I have had by her, namely MARYANN KING, WILLIAM KING, WILSY KING & ELIZABETH KING.  I also appoint the above named RACHELL BOOTMAN executrix of this my last will and testament.  In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 16th Day of May in the year of our lord 1797.

JOHN [his mark] KING  {seal}

Signed sealed published & declared by the above named JOHN KING to be his last will and testament in the presence of us who have hereunto subscribed our names as Witnesses in the presence of the testator


At a court held for Prince William County the 2nd day of October 1797

This last will & testament of JOHN KING decd. was presented to the Court by RACHEL BOOTMAN the Executrix therein named who made oath thereto according to law and the said will being proved by the oath of JOHN OARD is ordered to be recorded; and the said Executrix having taken the oath of an Executrix and entered into bond with JOHN OARD and WILLIAM ANNISS Jun. Her securities who swore they were worth one hundred dollars each after their debts are paid, certificate is granted her for obtaining a probate thereof in due form.



Sunday, November 22, 2015

Sunday's Obituary: Robert Weir

Alexandria Gazette
12 October 1842

At his residence in the County of Prince William, on Sunday, the 2d inst, after a protracted illness of several months, Robert Weir, Esq., in the 59th year of hsi age.

Mr. Weir was a native of Spotsylvania, and in early life a resident of Falmouth.  After leaving Falmouth, he settled in Tappahannock, where, for many years, he prosecuted trade as a Merchant.

His inflexible probity, untiring industry and patient devotion to business, resulted in the acquisition of an independent fortune.  Whilst his general benevolence, unostentatious but openhanded charity, warm, affectionate and confiding disposition, made him as generally beloved as universally esteemed throughout the circle of his acquaintance.  After retiring from trade, Mr. Weir removed to the neighborhood of Brentsville, where he has resided for the last ten years.

The life of but few men affords a picture of such unblemished virtue, without a friendship lost, or an enmity to regret.  He has left a widow and five children to lament his loss.

[Robert Weir was born 20 October 1784 and is buried in the Weir family cemetery in Manassas. ~cgl]

Friday, November 20, 2015

Friend of Friends Friday: Ran Away: John Williams

Alexandria Herald
29 September 1820


RAN AWAY from the subscriber's quarry, near Aquia: in the county of Stafford, Va. on the 15th of May last, a Negro fellow who calls himself JOHN WILLIAMS.  He is about 30 years of age, of a dark copper color, about 5 feet 10 or 11 inches high, remarkably yellow eyes, and when spoken to stammers very much; sometimes it is a minute before he can utter a word. His ears are pierced, and he sometimes wears in them a very shewy pair of rings.  He is a very likely fellow, and has no scar that we recollect to have observed.  He is the property of Mr. Alfred Ewell, of the county of Prince William, and hired to us by his brother Jesse Ewell, in said county, in whose neighborhood it is said he has a wife.  His mother lives in the vicinity of Occoquan, and he has an extensive acquaintance in the town of Alexandria.

At one of those places he is no doubt at this time lurking.  The above reward will be given if taken in Alexandria or beyond the limits of Virginia and secured in jail so that we get  him again, and ten dollars and all necessary charges paid if taken in one of the adjacent counties and brought home.

Rouzee Peyton & Co.

Sept. 11

Wednesday, November 18, 2015

Wedding Wednesday: Hooe / Kiewit

Evening Star (Washington, DC)
9 September 1899

Mr. John Meredith Hooe and Miss Margaret B. Kiewit, both of Nokesville, Va., were quietly married at the home of Mrs. R. V. Osmun, 917 12th street, Wedensday, the 6th instant, at 3:30 p.m.  The ceremony was performed in the presence of a few friends by the Rev. E. C. Shaver, assistant pastor of the New York Avenue Church.  Mr. and Mrs. Hooe are for the present at 310 C street northwest, where they will be glad to see their friends.

Sunday, November 15, 2015

Sunday's Obituary: Margaret Dulaney

Daily National Intelligencer (Washington, DC)
27 November 1845

At Dumfries, (Va) on Monady, the 24th instant, Mrs. Margaret Dulaney, aged 55 years, after a few days' illness.  Her death will be severely felt by her numerous relatives and friends, who deeply deplore the loss they have sustained in the death of this amiable and truly pious woman.  She had long been a devoted member of the Methodist Church, and one of the oldest inhabitants of that town.

She lived possessed of friendship and of love,
She died assured of endless bliss above.

Saturday, November 14, 2015

Newspaper Tidbit: PWCo Item: May 15, 1875

Alexandria Gazette
15 May 1875


Geo. W. Abel was seriously injured on Monday last by the falling of a blundering horse. He was on his way from Occoquan, where heh resides, and has been employed as ferryman, and when near Cedar Run bridge the horse he was riding fell, turning a complete summersault, throwing its rider over its head and falling upon him, the pummel of the saddle striking him in the pit of the stomach. The fall so stunned the horse that it laid on Mr. Able until it was pulled off but Mr. A. was up and walking about the next day.

On Thursday of last week as Mr. Joseph B. Reid was driving from Brentsville to Bristoe Station in his buggy, the horse coming in contact with the ox team of Mr. W. A. Ketcham, threw Mr. Reid out of the buggy, who, falling upon his head received very painful injuries. Mr. John H. Butler who was in the buggy with Mr. Reid jumped out as soon as the horse started, and was not hurt.

The attendance at the Circuit Cour was smaller than usual, though quite a large amount of business was done.  ~ Manassas Gazette